Archive | January 11th, 2018

An Empowered Woman’s Secret to a Successful Piggery

The part of women and its contributions to culture should never be underestimated in this predominantly male-controlled culture, like in the Philippines. Women-led organizations in the government, non-government organization, and private sector have molded and influenced national issues pertaining to governance and other economic-related happenings. More women and women organizations are now playing a proactive role towards national development. One good example is one Sustainable Livelihood Program Association based in Brgy. La Curva, San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. The SLPA is an all-women group composed of hog raisers and has been contributing economically to their barangay. This is the story of Teresita “Nanay Tere” Salde who chose to be an empowered woman.

Hog raising in the Philippines has been a profitable business for Filipinos through the decades. Its fame is obviously seen among backyards of rural families. An average Filipino usually raises a small number of pigs to supplement their daily needs. While both parents are busy with their work, children may help in raising a few piglets until they reach their merchantable age. No wonder, more hogs are produced in backyards compared to commercial swine raisers. In Barangay La Curva, it was acknowledged during the conduct of Participatory Livelihood Issue Analysis that there are Pantawid Partner Beneficiaries engaged in backyard hog raising. Usually, traders in the municipality especially public market pork dealers roam within the barangay to buy hogs.

Nanay Tere having no background in agronomy and getting involved onto it is no longer new. She thought that there are lot of enthusiasts all over the world into farming acquiring direct knowledge and involvement thru experiments, pushed by their own advocacy. Through time, she was able to apply such belief in swine raising.

Meant to be a farmer and a lot more, coming across a program of Department of Social Welfare and Development about livelihood and training is almost a surprise to her. Nanay Tere’s interest on pig farming started way back 2008. However, this faded because no one could lead her to an agency that provides training. In 2016, the craving hit again but this time it was purely unintentional.

Going back to the program, she was able to get a short training on livestock raising. Acquiring the basics on pig production and being a member in an organization put her desire in place. It was a perfect timing. Since then, Nanay Tere’s desire to pursue pig raising never left her. In 2016, she started her small farm in La Curva with 3 weaners for fattening from the Sustainable Livelihood Program of DSWD. She applied the feeding technique for swine she learnt at the training. Growth was good but transportation and feed cost pulled the profit. She lost enthusiasm that she almost wanted to quit.

At the moment, revenue is to be realized and even costs are piling up. Nanay Tere did not lose hope. She trusted that God is gracious to the one who preserve His land and the ecosystem. Despite the trials she bumped into due to barriers such as the existing market and operational expenses, she still pursued her business endeavor. As a whole, it is financially and emotionally draining for her.

The Basic Training on Swine Raising was a great help on her decision to put up a farm. “SLP is an enabler”, she added. Being a mother of seven, daily subsistence is really a struggle. But because of having hogs in her backyard, she was able to support their daily expenses and use some of the profit during emergency. She shared that there was a time when her youngest son was diagnosed with dengue and at the same day, she was bitten by a cat wherein free vaccine was not available. The pigs were her lifeline. All the medical expenses came from her small swine business.

“Moved by morals, I’m gaining while losing but at the end of the race, I am winning!” ends Nanay Tere.

Contributor:

Jaime V. Castillo Jr., Project Development Officer II, Occidental Mindoro

Posted in feature, Sustainable Livelihood ProgramComments (0)

Sustaining Livelihood through Enriched Skills and Social Responsibility

“When you are doing things that you consider precious, in turn, gives the best results for you. What results? Those that can’t, by any existing currencies, be bought, say, happiness, fulfillment and respect.” Ms. Myrna D. Blaza is a native from La Curva, San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. She was raised from a family whose everyday survival lies on farming and backyard pig raising. Though exposed to tremendous epidemics and various unnecessary encounters, her love for pigs has never faded; hereby strengthened and remained still through years instead.

Right after marriage, she instantly ventured on pig farming. It was the time when she asked her husband to build a small pig house for her to operate and manage. Her being exposed to her parents’ chores as pig raisers and farmers armed her the necessary skills and knowledge relevant to survive a pig business. Eventually, she maneuvered the overall operation of her small business.

Though well-armed already of knowledge and practice on hog raising, she is still open to innovative ideas that can improve her skills in the said venture. Indeed, one of her very remarkable traits is a successful swine raiser. The provision of additional pigs from the Sustainable Livelihood Program of Department of Social Welfare and Development is not only a help for Nanay Myrna but also a challenge to consider. She feels that she has a social responsibility to fulfill in making the said project successful. Truly, she was able to live on her words knowing that the pigs given to her initially on May 2016 was properly taken care of. Hence, she was able to sell and buy new ones.

A mother always wants the best for the family no matter what expense she gets in doing so. Likely, Nanay Myrna did all she can for the welfare of her children. She believes that the quality and overall condition of the family reflects how good the mother is in providing their needs. Just like in swine management, the health and productivity of pigs are correlated to how best their handlers are in managing them. Though with seven children, Nanay Myrna was able to contribute to their needs. As fruits of her labor, she was able to support her children’s financial expenses even if they already have their own family. She also shared that there are many notable benefits this kind of business can offer. One is that when her daughter-in-law had a very critical condition during her child delivery wherein she had to sell her two fully-grown pigs to pay for the medical expenses.

Above all these things, Nanay Myrna thanks God for pouring her life with plenty of blessings and love which she then shared to her family she cherished most.

Contributor:

Jaime V. Castillo Jr., Project Development Officer II, Occidental Mindoro

Posted in feature, Sustainable Livelihood ProgramComments (0)

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