Aborlan pushing for Organic Farming

Philippines is an agricultural country – with its abundant nature and good climate, a lot of local residents, especially on rural places, would engage in farming.

Zooming in lies the nature-loving province called Palawan. Located in the province is the municipality of Aborlan which is known as one of the biggest producers of agricultural products in southern Palawan.

Aborlan possesses a vast range of flat lands and terrains ideal for farming. Thus, it is no wonder that one of the major economic activities of the municipality is farming. It is practical that residents are taking advantage of their municipality’s features to have a livelihood; this was proven by the Participatory Livelihood Issue Analysis (PLIA) showing that there is a large number of farmers in Brgy. Barake engaged in vegetable production. This resulted to a formation of interested individuals into groups. A partnership engagement was established between Municipal Agriculture Office and Department of Social Welfare and Development – Sustainable Livelihood Program, in line with the thrust and priorities of Department of Agriculture to promote organic farming in Palawan and also to ensure the sustainability of the project.

This partnership aims to conduct skills training on organic vegetable farming with vermicomposting to provide skills and knowledge for the farmers on making organic pesticides and fertilizers using vermin-composting technology. This project possesses a wide range of economic and social benefits such as increasing the level of investment, aiding malnourishment in the community, and augmenting to the daily income of program participants to name a few.

The project started on January 25-26, 2016 through the collaborative effort of the Local Government Unit (LGU), BLGU, Western Philippines University (WPU), Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office (MSWDO) and Convergence team of Aborlan. In two years of operation, May Gamala, a beneficiary of the program, had her own sari-sari store wherein the capital to build this store was earned from her profit in selling organic vegetables and vermicompost. Given the high value of organically grown vegetables and vermicompost, she roughly earns a minimum of PHP 8,000.00 a week. Nowadays, the awareness on health benefits of organic products continues to spread through social media.

Partnership engagement followed by continuous monitoring and coaching of the participants was sought to deliver quality service and ensure the sustainability of the project.

Program participants, on the other hand, share insights in the operation. The increasing income of the program participants would stimulate economic growth in the community, promote healthier lifestyle, and sustain healthy environment.

Contributor:

DSWD-SLP Palawan

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Soaring High Through Hog Raising

Filipinos are always practical; we do everything just to financially provide for our families in ways we know. We look around, and are always on the go to find livelihood projects that are beneficial and lucrative when fearlessly ventured.

The hog raising industry has been touted to be just such. Many Palaweños in the rural areas of Palawan still find it profitable notwithstanding the extreme hard work and unremitting patience the growers need to possess while raising the piglets. After all, the hog raising industry will generate income. Many residents in Brgy. San Juan in Aborlan are also into the hog-raising industry, as it provides them livelihood. It enables them to buy things for their children and pay the rent. While they are satisfied with the money the pigs sold put on their table, there’s something they lack: an association.

It was observed during the Sustainable Livelihood Program preliminaries in the barangay that all its residents possess the characteristics needed for the establishment of an association: camaraderie, unity, and willingness to learn. So formation of hog raising association they did. Through the help of the Community Core Group (CCG), a hog raising group with 41 households and leaders was formed within the four sitios of Brgy. San Juan. Aside from the formation of their association, hog raisers also went through trainings that opened their eyes to the challenges besetting the business, and the ways on how to overcome them to meet their targets.

Through the Local Government Units (LGUs) and National Government Agencies (NGAs), the trainings were made possible and series of lectures on hog-raising industry were presented to the participants.  The Western Philippines University (WPU) and Department of Agriculture (DA) served as instruments in the conduct of this endeavor. After the trainings, the participants were made to buy and raise two-month old piglets so after 3-4 months or 120 calendar days, the pigs weighing 85 kilos in average pegging at PHP 100.00 per kilo can then be sold in the market. After selling, they will have to buy another of the same age, so the cycle would repeat again.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development – Sustainable Livelihood Program in partnership with LGUs, through the Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office (MSWDO) along with BLGU, will ensure the success of the participants’ endeavor in hog raising using the knowledge they gained from the training and knowledge sharing.

The Municipal Agriculture Office will also continuously render technical assistance to the participants who are taking the risks of raising the hogs, to ensure their survival and productivity; the process is not easy because it is painstaking and taxing, given the food which the hog raisers need to give the pigs on top of its other needs before they are sold in the market.

Also with the help of different agencies, a communal hog raising project will also be launched this year in Brgy. San Juan, where a community piggery will already be made available to the participants. Once finalized and implemented, it will boost the income of the residents that will pique the economic growth in the community, or barangay for that matter, as it is seen to beef up the expenditures for goods and services, thus paving the way for economic and forward linkages for the betterment of the barangay.

The community piggery project will likewise boost the expansion of meat supply in the municipality of Aborlan, which will ensure food security to secure an escape from hunger in the community, in support of the national government’s food sufficiency goal. As such, the beneficiaries of the project shall be first and foremost the needy, but can however live up to the agreements and promises they make preceding the occupation of the community piggery. The project will give them the opportunity to possess a micro-enterprise of their own at the lowest possible cost. This will also provide them a venue to improve their living condition from the profits they will gain once hogs are sold which will, in a way, lift them from the stranglehold of penury.

There doesn’t seem to be a bigger impediment in the implementation of the project than the ones the implementers can handle; the minor ones are manageable. It accordingly will promote better welfare to the residents because it stimulates economic development in the municipality.

Contributor:

DSWD-SLP Palawan

Posted in #SibolKabuhayan, #SibolNegosyo, feature, Sustainable Livelihood ProgramComments (0)

SLP Marinduque, Marinduque State College hold Skills Training for Meat Processing

In partnership with Marinduque State College (MSC), the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) conducted a series of skills training on meat processing last January 27-28 and February 2-3, 2018.

Participants from various barangays of Boac gathered at the food laboratory of MSC. The organizers also invited Ms. Nenita Gonzales and Ms. Ma. Edelwina Blasé who served as resource speakers for the training.

Participants answered the pre-test examination before they were assembled into smaller groups for the training proper. Some of the discussions include the principles and procedure of meat processing, meat preservation, and even food presentation which the participants enjoyed a lot.

Each group was then assigned to evaluate the performance and product of the other groups through food tasting. Two of the participants shared their insights on the overall training before the certificates and tokens were awarded to the speakers.

SLP partners with different service providers for the conduct of skills training to hone the participants on the modality they chose.

 

Contributor:

Pamela Ligas, Project Development Officer II, Marinduque

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SLP Beneficiaries receive 93 Starter kits for Butterfly Project

To further capacitate the beneficiaries of the butterfly project, the Sustainable Livelihood Program distributed 93 starter kits to the barangays of Boac including Caganhao, Tugos, Canat and Boi.

The beneficiaries were given nets and plywood as materials for their chosen livelihood. They have also undergone an enhancement training to ensure that they have the full knowledge in butterfly industry.

The beneficiaries were lucky enough to be trained by the exporters of butterfly. Some of the topics discussed are the standard quality and varieties of in-demand butterfly. This partnership hopes to link them to growers and potential buyers.

The skills training comes with the provision of starter kits to improve the productivity and profitability of the participants in the hopes of their economic sufficiency.

 

Contributor:

Adonis T. Analista, Project Development Officer II, Marinduque

Posted in #SibolKabuhayan, #SibolNegosyo, news, Sustainable Livelihood ProgramComments (0)

Cooperative Development Authority conducts Capacity Building to SLP-assisted Project

On January 11, 2018, the Cooperative Development Authority (CDA) conducted a capacity building activity to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP)-assisted project in Bangbangalon, Boac, Marinduque.

Bangbangalon Consumers Cooperative is an organized SLP Association which was developed into cooperative to engage in catering and feeds retailing.

Mr. Rey Evangelista, a CDA staff, conducted a reorientation about the definition and importance of cooperatives, and roles of officers and members. He also held a coaching and mentoring session for the participants to better understand the value of cooperatives in the micro-enterprise development. He emphasized that it is the members of cooperative who could bring success to the cooperative more than the other way around.

The extent of the cooperative’s achievement depends on their synergetic perseverance. Transparency and increasing membership is also a top secret for the longevity of their organization.

CDA provides technical assistance to SLP-assisted cooperatives as part of their commitment to the Provincial NGANI partnership of Marinduque dated April 12, 2016 to work hand-in-hand in helping communities prosper economically.

Contributor:

Adonis T. Analista, Project Development Officer II, Marinduque

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An Empowered Woman’s Secret to a Successful Piggery

The part of women and its contributions to culture should never be underestimated in this predominantly male-controlled culture, like in the Philippines. Women-led organizations in the government, non-government organization, and private sector have molded and influenced national issues pertaining to governance and other economic-related happenings. More women and women organizations are now playing a proactive role towards national development. One good example is one Sustainable Livelihood Program Association based in Brgy. La Curva, San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. The SLPA is an all-women group composed of hog raisers and has been contributing economically to their barangay. This is the story of Teresita “Nanay Tere” Salde who chose to be an empowered woman.

Hog raising in the Philippines has been a profitable business for Filipinos through the decades. Its fame is obviously seen among backyards of rural families. An average Filipino usually raises a small number of pigs to supplement their daily needs. While both parents are busy with their work, children may help in raising a few piglets until they reach their merchantable age. No wonder, more hogs are produced in backyards compared to commercial swine raisers. In Barangay La Curva, it was acknowledged during the conduct of Participatory Livelihood Issue Analysis that there are Pantawid Partner Beneficiaries engaged in backyard hog raising. Usually, traders in the municipality especially public market pork dealers roam within the barangay to buy hogs.

Nanay Tere having no background in agronomy and getting involved onto it is no longer new. She thought that there are lot of enthusiasts all over the world into farming acquiring direct knowledge and involvement thru experiments, pushed by their own advocacy. Through time, she was able to apply such belief in swine raising.

Meant to be a farmer and a lot more, coming across a program of Department of Social Welfare and Development about livelihood and training is almost a surprise to her. Nanay Tere’s interest on pig farming started way back 2008. However, this faded because no one could lead her to an agency that provides training. In 2016, the craving hit again but this time it was purely unintentional.

Going back to the program, she was able to get a short training on livestock raising. Acquiring the basics on pig production and being a member in an organization put her desire in place. It was a perfect timing. Since then, Nanay Tere’s desire to pursue pig raising never left her. In 2016, she started her small farm in La Curva with 3 weaners for fattening from the Sustainable Livelihood Program of DSWD. She applied the feeding technique for swine she learnt at the training. Growth was good but transportation and feed cost pulled the profit. She lost enthusiasm that she almost wanted to quit.

At the moment, revenue is to be realized and even costs are piling up. Nanay Tere did not lose hope. She trusted that God is gracious to the one who preserve His land and the ecosystem. Despite the trials she bumped into due to barriers such as the existing market and operational expenses, she still pursued her business endeavor. As a whole, it is financially and emotionally draining for her.

The Basic Training on Swine Raising was a great help on her decision to put up a farm. “SLP is an enabler”, she added. Being a mother of seven, daily subsistence is really a struggle. But because of having hogs in her backyard, she was able to support their daily expenses and use some of the profit during emergency. She shared that there was a time when her youngest son was diagnosed with dengue and at the same day, she was bitten by a cat wherein free vaccine was not available. The pigs were her lifeline. All the medical expenses came from her small swine business.

“Moved by morals, I’m gaining while losing but at the end of the race, I am winning!” ends Nanay Tere.

Contributor:

Jaime V. Castillo Jr., Project Development Officer II, Occidental Mindoro

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Sustaining Livelihood through Enriched Skills and Social Responsibility

“When you are doing things that you consider precious, in turn, gives the best results for you. What results? Those that can’t, by any existing currencies, be bought, say, happiness, fulfillment and respect.” Ms. Myrna D. Blaza is a native from La Curva, San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. She was raised from a family whose everyday survival lies on farming and backyard pig raising. Though exposed to tremendous epidemics and various unnecessary encounters, her love for pigs has never faded; hereby strengthened and remained still through years instead.

Right after marriage, she instantly ventured on pig farming. It was the time when she asked her husband to build a small pig house for her to operate and manage. Her being exposed to her parents’ chores as pig raisers and farmers armed her the necessary skills and knowledge relevant to survive a pig business. Eventually, she maneuvered the overall operation of her small business.

Though well-armed already of knowledge and practice on hog raising, she is still open to innovative ideas that can improve her skills in the said venture. Indeed, one of her very remarkable traits is a successful swine raiser. The provision of additional pigs from the Sustainable Livelihood Program of Department of Social Welfare and Development is not only a help for Nanay Myrna but also a challenge to consider. She feels that she has a social responsibility to fulfill in making the said project successful. Truly, she was able to live on her words knowing that the pigs given to her initially on May 2016 was properly taken care of. Hence, she was able to sell and buy new ones.

A mother always wants the best for the family no matter what expense she gets in doing so. Likely, Nanay Myrna did all she can for the welfare of her children. She believes that the quality and overall condition of the family reflects how good the mother is in providing their needs. Just like in swine management, the health and productivity of pigs are correlated to how best their handlers are in managing them. Though with seven children, Nanay Myrna was able to contribute to their needs. As fruits of her labor, she was able to support her children’s financial expenses even if they already have their own family. She also shared that there are many notable benefits this kind of business can offer. One is that when her daughter-in-law had a very critical condition during her child delivery wherein she had to sell her two fully-grown pigs to pay for the medical expenses.

Above all these things, Nanay Myrna thanks God for pouring her life with plenty of blessings and love which she then shared to her family she cherished most.

Contributor:

Jaime V. Castillo Jr., Project Development Officer II, Occidental Mindoro

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Sapat na Puhunan para sa Maunlad na Kabuhayan

Siya si Rey Mendoza, 38 taong gulang mula sa Barangay Rosacara, Bansud, Oriental Mindoro. Siya ay miyembro ng SEA-K sa loob ng walong buwan sa pag-asang maiaangat ang buhay katulong ang kanyang maybahay na si Mary Joy Mendoza na 28 taong gulang. Mayroon silang tatlong anak, dalawang lalaki at isang babae na sa kasalukuyan ay nag-aaral sa mababang paaralan ng Barangay Rosacara.

“Mula sa simple at mahirap na buhay, malaki ang naging katulungan ng mga programa ng DSWD sa aming pamilya. Una ay ang Pantawid Pamilya Program na kung saan isa sa aking mga anak ang naging benepisyaryo nito na tumutulong upang ito ay aming mapag-aral. At bilang isa ding benepisyaryo ng Pantawid Pamilya, naging prayoridad ako ng Sustainable Livelihood Program, ang bagong programa na itinalaga ng DSWD para kami ay bigyan ng kapasidad na mapaunlad ang aming pamumuhay at mapalawak ang iba pa naming mga kakayahan,” ani Mang Rey.

Si Mang Rey ay isa sa dalawampu’t limang miyembro ng SEA-K sa kanilang barangay at naatasang maging Chairman ng kanilang grupo na nabigyan ng pagkakataong makahiram ng puhunan na nagkakahalaga ng siyam na libong piso (9,000.00) upang gamitin sa kanyang maliit na tubigan.   “Ngunit ang perang tinanggap ko ay inilaan at ginamit ko sa pagbili ng 7 biik. Dito ko pinagkasya ang pera dahil huli na naming natanggap o dumating ang pera para sa aking proposal na pagbili ng abono sa tubigan,” wika niya.

Sa mga nakalipas na buwan, katulong niya ang kanyang asawa sa pagpapakain at pagpapaligo ng mga hayop at iba pa nilang pinagkukunan ng kabuhayan gaya ng maliit nilang sagingan. “Yung mga gastusin sa araw-araw na pagkain ng mga alagang baboy lalo ngayon ang mahal ng mga bilihin at iyong ibang pangangailangan pa namin sa loob at labas ng bahay ay hindi madali. Kami ay nahirapan pero nakakaya din gawan ng paraan kahit papano. May maliit kaming sagingan kung saan doon namin kinukuha ang iba pang pangangailangan. Isang malaking tulong talaga ang SEA-K sa amin dahil natuto kaming magbudget ng pera at nakakapag-ipon na kami ngayon,” tugon ni Rey at Mary Joy.

“Noong mga panahon na wala pa ang SEA-K, malaki ang pagkakaiba ng buhay namin noon. Mahirap talaga. Sa ngayon ay masasabi ko sigurong sapat na ang isa sa mga tulong na natanggap namin mula sa programa ng SLP dahil nagkaroon kami ng panibagong negosyo at dagdag na mapagkakakitaan dahil dati sa tubigan lang at maliit na sagingan. Plano naming ipagpatuloy at palaguin ang kasalukuyan naming hanapbuhay”, dagdag pa ng mag-asawa. Sa halagang 9,000.00 na puhunang ipinahiram sa kanya, siya ay may lingguhan ng savings na nagkakahalaga ng 126.00 at balik-kapital na 2,880.00 tuwing ika-apat na buwan.

Nitong nakaraang mga buwan ay naibenta niya ang kanyang alagang baboy kung saan nag-iwan lamang siya ng isa upang gawing inahin upang mapanatili ang kanilang proyekto. Ang pinagbentahan ay ibinili niya muli ng walong biik na siya naman ulit nilang aalagaan. Sa kasalukuyan, sila ay nagkaroon ng kita na nagkakahalaga ng anim na libo (6,000.00) kada buwan. “Gamitin ng maayos para sa negosyo at ayon sa sariling kakayahan ang pera na ipinahiram at hindi ginagastos sa kung saan,” wika ni Mary Joy. Maliban dito, nakapagtayo din ng maliit na tindahan ang mag-asawa na isa pa sa mga pinagkukunan nila ng panggastos sa araw-araw.

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