Tag Archive | "DSWD IV-MiMaRoPa"

Pantawid Pamilya conducts PL Training Level II


Parent leaders of Romblon on the second-day of their training listening to discussion of module

After 3 weeks of conducting separate trainings in the provinces of MiMaRoPa, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) ended its Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program’s Skills Enhancement for Parent Leaders as Program Advocates (PL Level II Training) in Palawan on May 5, 2017.

A total of 168 parent leaders from the five provinces of the region attended the training, with 26 participants in Occidental Mindoro, 36 participants in Oriental Mindoro, 18 participants in Marinduque, 36 participants in Romblon, and 52 participants in Palawan.

The training aims to equip parent leaders with knowledge and skills in becoming program advocates or information disseminator to confidently and effectively speak about the program for better appreciation and understanding of Pantawid and non-Pantawid partners. The program was filled with modules and activities that reviewed them about the program, as well as assess, evaluate, and demonstrate how to become effective communicators, leaders, and community volunteers.

Starting the first batch separately in Occidental and Oriental Mindoro on April 18-21, 2017, the said training provided workshops on the following areas of concern: 1) roles of parent leader; 2) self-appreciation; and 3) effective communication. Furthermore, the parent leaders were also provided updates of the program and given information on guidelines on the provision of rice subsidy to Pantawid Pamilya households, all of which are essential in the performance of their respective functions. Training in Marinduque and Romblon was conducted separately on April 25-28.

In Palawan, selected parent leaders were given a chance to be invited as radio guests in Radyo ng Bayan, one of the local radio stations in the province, where they were asked mainly about rice subsidy, and how the Pantawid Pamilya put impacts to their lives. Some were also able to share their written songs and poems on air, while the others were able to observe how radio interviews are being done.

Each province capped off the 4-day training with testimonials of the parent leaders. Parent leaders expressed excitement on the possible advocacy engagements that might be given to them in the future. Moreover, they also expressed willingness to conduct re-echo sessions with their fellow parent leaders during Family Development Sessions (FDS) and parent leaders meeting. ###

Posted in newsComments (0)

DSWD conducts 2nd RMDC


DSC_0102RD3

 

DSWD IV-MiMaRoPa conducts 2nd Regional Management Development Conference (RMDC) at Haven Tagaytay Hotel.

RMDC aims to discuss the possible internal integration or convergence of programs,services,or plans aligned with DSWD strategic goals and objectives.

Posted in UncategorizedComments (0)

MiMaRoPans bracing selves from El Niño


Malate, Manila – Despite the continuous impact of El Niño weather phenomenon in MiMaRoPa, 11,043 affected farmers/fisherfolks have remained resilient and optimistic that drought is ephemeral and will eventually end.

Department of Social Welfare and Development has consistently been part of this unwavering hope. Department has committed to unswervingly provided relief assistance to the affected areas.

As of 3PM, 20 April, DSWD has already delivered Php 1,701,960.00 to MiMaRoPa.

From 11,043 farmers/fisherfolks, 151 are from Oriental Mindoro; 2,551 from Occidental Mindoro; 878 from Romblon; 1, 205 from Marinduque; and 6,258 from Palawan.

In Cagayancillo, Palawan, all 605 Pantawid beneficiaries are affected.

Also, according to Municipal Agriculture Office (MAO), affected agriculture areas are the following: 62.6 hectares in Mamburao, Occidental Mindoro; 1,223.35 ha of rice fields in 14 municipalities of Romblon; 700 ha of cultivated lowland rice area in Araceli, Palawan; 408.94 ha of rice fields in Narra, Palawan; 884.1 ha of land in Quezon, Palawan; and 251.45 ha of land in San Vicente, Palawan.

DSWD is consistently preparing and delivering family food packs to the affected areas.

A total of 1, 428 family food packs were delivered to Araceli Palawan while 1, 598  were distributed to Roxas, Palawan.

In addition, a total of 478 family food packs were distributed to the municipality of Odiongan, Romblon while 300 family food packs, amounting to Php108,000.00 were delivered to Oriental Mindoro.

NJSC General Merchandisse in the province of Oriental Mindoro donated the following with a total amount of Php 940,197.30: 23,328 cans of corned beef; 20,800 cans of sardines; and 31,200 3-in-1 coffee sachet.

As of this writing, there is an on-going procurement of 2, 500 bottles of six-liter bottled water and 625 kilos of monggo in Oriental Mindoro.

In order to expedite the relief assistance to the affected areas, DSWD will deploy staff based on El Nino Deploymnet Plan and will continue its coordination with other concerned agencies such as Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, Philippine Red Cross, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), Church Organizations, and Local Government Units (LGUs).

 

Posted in UncategorizedComments (0)

MiMaRoPa El Niño: DSWD step up efforts


Malate, Manila – Department of Social Welfare and Development, in coordination with aid agencies, is stepping up help for the affected families in MiMaRoPa, amid concerns over the conditions faced by the victims.

As of 3PM, 19 April, report shows that there are 10, 663 affected farmers/fisherfolks in forty (40) municipalities in MiMaRoPa.

Of the 10,663 affected farmers/fisherfoks, 151 are from Oriental Mindoro; 2,175 from Occidental Mindoro; 878 from Romblon; 1205 from Marinduque; and 6,254 from Palawan.

DSC_0487

DSWD Quick Response Team monitoring the impact of El Nino in MiMaRoPa

Focus is turning to delivery of food packs and assistance.

A total of 300 food packs were transported to Calapan, Oriental Mindoro.

On the other hand, a cash for work amounted to Php206,000.00 were provided to a total of 100 beneficiaries for the cleaning of irrigation canals and water lily impounding facility in four (4) municipalities of Romblon.

For Palawan, 1, 428 food packs were delivered to Araceli Palawan while 799 family food packs were provided to Roxas Palawan.

Also, 822 affected farmers were included in the proposal for Immediate Short Term Employment thru Cash For Work in the three (3) barangays of Roxas, Palawan with a total budget requirement of Php1,911,060.00 in partnership with municipal or barangay local government unit having a proposed counterpart of Php530,000.00.

Proposals are to be transmitted and for approval of the regional office.
###

.

Posted in UncategorizedComments (0)

Sisters’ Keeper: Senior Citizen worthy of Marble Monument


 

‘My Sister’s Keeper’ is a story of a girl who was conceived to be a savior of her sister, who is suffering acute leukemia, by donating compatible organs, blood, and tissue at her own risks.

In Capaclan Romblon Romblon, there is a heroine comparable to Sister’s Keeper. However, unlike in the movie, she preserves her promise to keep her sisters alive.

As sturdy and pure as a marble, Luisa Maduro Tome serves as the strong foundation and savior of the two elderly— Lourdes Lachica, 83, and Celedonia Mojar Tome, 84 —  who live alone near her home in Brgy. Capaclan, Romblon Romblon .  Even they are not related by blood, she considers them as her true family.

Luisa is their sisters’ keeper.

It may not be organs, blood, and tissue that she has donated, but it is her own life and soul that she has offered and dedicated to Lourdes and Celedonia.

What makes her extraordinary keeper? She is also a senior citizen, with nothing but dignity and purest heart.

Life as thin as stick

Luisa, 77, a widow for 10 years, without children, is a true image of a loving and dedicated sister with a heart like Mother Teresa.  She is altruistic, always others-oriented.

Luisa, Lourdes, and Celedonia are all Social Pension beneficiaries since 2015.

The government’s Social Pension Program (Social Pension) implemented by the Department of Social Welfare and Development provides a monthly stipend  of P500.00 to indigent senior citizens as mandated by Republic Act 9994 or the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010 Hardships in life.

According to Luisa, life before Social Pension Program is full of hardships and challenges especially that no one is taking care and supporting her.

“Sobrang hirap po talaga ng buhay ko bago yaan (Social Pension Program). Kasi balo na ako ng 10 taon. Tapos wala rin akong anak. Wala ring mga kapatid na tumutulong sa akin. Ako lang lahat, ako lang bumubuhay at nag-aalaga sa sarili ko. Kahit may sakit ako, ako lang,” narrated Luisa while she tries to pose her sincerest smile behind all pains she had experienced.

She has been pierced with irony of life. Even Romblon is known for Marble, she lives in a Nipa Hut made of light materials, with weak foundation, with no electricity and with no direct source of water. Every time there is typhoon, her heart is covered with fear because of danger posed by strong winds and heavy rainfall.

“Dyaan lang po ako nakatira. Mabilis pong magiba yan. Mag-isa lang po ako kaya nakakatakot talaga kapag bumabagyo.”

 

Luisa doesn’t have a regular source of income. She used to be a ‘walis tingting’ or broomstick vendor.  However, due to her old age, she had difficulty producing broomsticks and peddling it in town.

“Walis tingting lang po ang pinagkakaabalahan ko dati. Kaunti lang po ang kita… Pero hindi na po halos ngayon kasi mahirap na pong maglako sa bayan,” recounted Luisa.
Luisa remains selfless and generous even she had nothing for herself.  She is more concern for the well-being of Lourdes and Celedonia whom she treated as her true sisters.  She always prays for God’s guidance and for her survival — not for her own sake, but for the sake of her sisters so she can continue to take care of them.

Sisters’ Keeper: Sisterhood bonded by heart and soul

“Kahit matanda na po ako. Ako po talaga ang nag-aalaga sa kanila. Wala rin po sa kanilang tumutulong. Kaya gusto ko na lagi akong malakas at hindi magkasakit para mabantayan ko sila,” narrated Luisa as she presses the shoulder of her sisters, showing her unwavering love and support.

Just like Luisa, Lourdes and Celedonia have no one and nothing for themselves. They are also frail and sickly. Lourdes is deaf, mute, and can’t stand on her own while Celedonia has eye problem and has ear impairment.

Luisa, even as senior citizen herself, served as their light and foundation.

“Ako ang tumutulong sa kanila. Kapag may sakit sila, ako ang tumatakbo ng hospital pagkuha ng gamut. Iniigiban ko rin sila ng tubig. Sinasakay ko rin sila sa traysikul kapag pupunta sila sa bayan,” humbly narrated by Luisa.

She is their sisters’ keeper.

She make sure their daily needs are met; she accompanies them in town; she fetches pails of water for them; she takes care of them and buys their medicine every time they are sick.  She does everything to keep her sisters alive.

Social Pension: A program for senior citizens which is sturdy as a marble

Despite all the trials she had encountered in her life, she stays resilient and optimist. She always has a reason to smile and always pray hard for God’s guidance.

Her life becomes even brighter when she became Social Pension Beneficiary last 2015. Luisa is thankful for the regular remittance she receives from DSWD saying that it is a vast help for her to meet her daily needs. She also uses the money to buy her medicines and for the repair of her house.

“Malaking tulong po talaga ang P500.00. Nakabili po ako ng pagkain, ng isda, ng gamut, ng bigas. Nakapagpa-repair din po ako ng bahay. Nagpapasalamat po ako sa inyo at sa Ginoo.”

The priority beneficiaries of the Social Pension are senior citizens who are frail, sickly and disabled, without a regular source of income and/or support from any member of the family, and not receiving other pension benefits from government and private agencies.

As of 2015, there are 7, 575 Social Pension beneficiaries in Romblon province.

Being altruistic, she also helped Lourdes and Celedonia to be Social Pension beneficiaries. She assisted them in processing their requirements and documents. Until now, she serves as their guide in life. Every time there is pay-out in town, she escorts and accompanies them.

“ Tuwing kukuha po ng pera sa bayan. Ako po ang umaalalay sa kanila. Sinasakay ko po sila sa traysikul bilang hindi na nga po sila makalakad ng ayos,” recalled Luisa.

Worthy of monument made of marble, Luisa generously shares her blessings. Her P500.00 per month is not only for her but for the three of them.  Her sisters are more important than her life. She prays that God will extend her life so she can continuously serve Lourdes and Celedonia.

“Sabi ko nga, sana hindi na muna ako kunin ng Ginoo (Panginoon). Dahil iniisip koi tong’ dalawa. Ako lang ang nag-aalaga sa kanila,” said Luisa while she is trying to hold her tears.

###

 

 

Posted in UncategorizedComments (0)

DSWD grants P450K livelihood assistance to beneficiaries in Cuyo


Members of the association prepare the fish net for the construction of fishcage

Members of the association prepare the fish net for the construction of fish cage.

CUYO, PALAWAN – The Cuyo Fishermen SLP Association received Php450,000.00 livelihood assistance fund from the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s (DSWD)  Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

The association with 45 members in barangay Suba, created under SLP modalities, was one of the recipients of the Enterprise Capital Assistance (ECA) which provided a starting capital for the establishment of fish cages.

This was funded under Post Yolanda Recovery and Rehabilitation Program (YRRP) which aims to give livelihood support to Super Typhoon Yolanda affected Communities.

To date, association has generated Php135, 000.00 from the 1.3 tons of fish caught.

SLP, a community-based capacity-building program that seeks to improve the socio-economic status of its participants, is implemented using the Community-Driven Enterprise Development approach which enables participants to contribute to production and labor markets by looking at available resources and accessible markets.###

Posted in newsComments (0)

Development Partners Hold a Joint Implementation Support Mission in Region IV-Mimaropa


Manila, Philippines – KALAHI-CIDSS IV-MiMaRoPa successfully staged the fourth Joint Implementation Support Mission in Busuanga and Coron, Palawan last October 6 – 9, 2015. This is part of the regular activity conducted by the development partners jointly with the key officials of KALAHI-CIDSS and national government agencies (NGAs) in order to determine if covenants and performance targets are being met. This collaborative effort is a milestone in the pursuit of mainstreaming community-driven development in the region.

The mission team was comprised of Leonardo Paat of World Bank; Joel Mangahas, Yukiko Ito and Jane Austria-Young of Asian Development Bank (ADB); Edwin Concepcion and Evelyn Diezmo of Department of Energy and Natural Resources (DENR); Raul Alamis of Department of Health (DOH); Edelito Sumangil of National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP); Rodrigo Emag, Sr. of National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC); and Benilda Redaja, Jay Aribbay, Rannon Padriano, Joyce Palacol, Bessie Magtangob, Sylvia Nachura and Regina Jezika Escudero from the National Program Management Office (NPMO). Participants were split into two groups to simultaneously interview stakeholders in four barangays of the municipality of Busuanga and Coron.

The mission kicked off with a dialogue with the Municipal Inter-Agency Committee (MIAC) members of municipality of Busuanga, led by Vice-Mayor Elizabeth Cervantes. This was immediately followed with an on-site visit to Brgy. New Busuanga and Brgy. Quezon for an open forum with the barangay officials and community volunteers. On the next day, the team visited Brgy. Cabugao and Brgy. Lajala in Coron. A focus group discussion with the MIAC members, led by Municipal Assessor Reynario Labrador, was also conducted.

National Program Manager Benilda Redaja commended the strong involvement and participation in the communities. She added, “They demonstrated strong ownership over their sub-project and effectively articulated not just how it responds to their need but how it links up to other priorities and funding opportunities.”

KALAHI-CIDSS is a DSWD program that seeks to alleviate poverty using the Community-Driven Development (CDD) approach as its over-all community development approach and strategy. The CDD approach ensures that development priorities are addressed in a participatory, collective, inclusive, and in demand-driven way. This is done through localized decision-making during social preparation activities, and in the identification, development, prioritization, establishment, and operationalization of community projects. ###

Posted in UncategorizedComments (0)

Urduja of Seaweeds Production in Taytay Palawan


Seaweeds

Gaudiosa M. Alto, president of Bagong Pag-asa Association, is known as Urduja of Seaweeds Production.

Urduja is a legendary Filipino heroine recognized for her strong leadership and passion for serving the people. Deviating from stereotype about woman being weak and passive, Urduja showed that she is a ruler who can mobilize and defend her people. She is a true legendary warrior.

In the midst of sea paradise in Taytay Palawan, there is also a strong, independent and dedicated woman recognized as Urduja of Seaweeds Farming.

Gaudiosa M. Alto, 63, is the president of Bagong Pag-Asa Association (BPA), an organization guided by Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) IV- MiMaRoPa Sustainable Livelihood Program.

During the field visit, as the cold breeze touched her skin and splash of water lingered in her feet, Gaudiosa started to tell her story. Her stories pierced the heart and soul of the listeners. She looked straight into our eyes and sincerely told every chapter of the book of her life: every journey she had encountered, every failure she had tasted and every triumph she had reached.

As she gazed in the sky painted with mixture of  gray and tangerine triggering a feeling of longing, she reminisced her experiences before the SLP Seaweeds Production.

Life dark as a coal

 

Life before the SLP seaweeds production was full of hardship and uncertainty.

“Mahirap po ang buhay namin dati bago ‘yang SLP, para pong laging may pangamba,” recalled Gaudiosa.

Coal mining was her primary source of income.  As a coal miner, Gaudiosa’s life was full of darkness and fear.  It was always like a vacuum: sufocated with emptiness and no direction.

Her life was always at risk.

“Dati po kaming nag-uuling. Para kami ay maka-survive (pinasok na namin ang pag-uuling). Ay mahirap mag-uling! Buhay ang nakataya dyan,” said Gaudiosa while trying to control the crystal clear tears from falling in her eyes.

Aside from being illegal, coal mining posed risks in her health and her environment.

However difficult life has been, she didn’t lose hope.  Risks of her previous work pushed her to look for greater opportunities.  With the help of Edilberto Y. Felizarte, Pamantulon Taytay Palawan Barangay Chairman, Gaudiosa discovered the opportunities offered by SLP.

“Huminigi si kapitan ng tulong sa SLP kung pwede raw bigyan kami ng hanapbuhay. Ito nga ang binigay, ang pagse-seaweads,” Gaudiosa stated.

 

Seaweeds: treasure in the heart of sea paradise of Taytay, Palawan

 

Sustainable Livelihood Program introduced Seaweeds Production in 2013.  This project has been offered by DSWD-SLP to Gaudiosa since the municipality of Taytay provides a sustainable environment for seaweed production because it is strategically located in a relatively typhoon-free area having wide reef areas, extended marine coastlines and wide coastal shelves.

Aiming to improve their knowledge and skills in seaweeds farming, Gaudiosa, together with other partner-beneficiaries, undergone the six (6) day training of SLP provided by the Department of Agriculture Bureaus of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Regional Fisheries Training Center Palawan and DSWD-SLP.

This six days of training changed their lives forever.

Asked about her life transformation, Gaudiosa answered genuinely. Her voice rattled and became more sincere.  Her eyes widened as if letting you glimpse into her soul.

“Napakasaya ko po. Malaking tulong talaga pag-seaweeds sa amin. Laking pagbabago po talaga,” said Gaudiosa while posing her sweetest and sincerest smile.

She was able to breakaway from dragging and hazardous livelihood. No more sleepless nights worrying what will happen to them during their work. No more despair on things they can’t give and promise to their family. No more emptiness, risk and darkness — only light and future full of hope and prosperity.

 

Godsend Wealth: Benefits of Seaweeds

Seaweeds2

Seaweeds farmers preparing the propagules for planting in the sea paradise of Taytay, Palawan.

Treasure in the heart of sea paradise of Taytay Palawan brought illuminating light in the dark life of Gaudiosa.

Every strand of seaweeds is like a rope made of gold, a discovered wealth.  Seaweeds served as the primary source of income, it strengthen the tie of relationship with her family and knitted her closely with the community.

Gaudiosa’s wealth is her family. As bread winner,  she spends all her income for her family, most specially for the education of her grandchildren.

“Dito kami kumukuha ng pagkain at mga gamit na pampaaral sa aming mga anak.”

Seaweeds also transformed the lives of members of her community.

With the help of DSWD-SLP, two major associations were organized: Bagong Pag-asa and Taytay Palawan Seaweed Farmers Federation.

Gaudiosa is the president of Bagong Pag-asa. It is noticeable that all her members are all men and yet, everyone of them has high regard and respect for Gaudiosa. She really shows great leadership in the members of her association. Indeed, she is Urduja of the seaweeds production.

During the  planting and harvesting season, everyone gathers together —  sharing unceasing stories, unwavering hopes and never-ending laughters.

 

Everlasting Treasure: Sustainability of Seaweeds Production

 

With the success she has tasted, Gaudiosa don’t want to remain dependent on what SLP and other agencies have given them. She wants a sustainable business. She is dreaming of being in full control of seaweeds production, free from the abuse and cruelty of middle men.

“ Malaki na po ang tulong ng SLP. Pero syempre po hinihiling ko po na kami na talaga mamahala sa seaweeds. Para po hindi na kami umaasa sa mga middle man. Madalas po kasi lugi kami,” emphasized by Gaudiosa.

Seaweeds is in demand in the market all year round thus making it more sustainbale with the technical support from partner agencies in the areas of organizational development and marketing.

 

 

Victory of Urduja of Seaweeds Production

 

Gaudiosa like Urduja has tasted countless battles in her life but she remained standing like a true warrior. In her journey, no matter how many gigantic waves will come and collosal combats she will encounter, she will alsways give a whirl in order to protect and serve her family and her people.

For all the victories she has achieved, she is grateful to her family and seaweeds farming: the true treasure of her life. ###

 

 

Posted in feature, featured stories, news, Story of changeComments (0)

Page 1 of 3123

Notice to the Public

Listahanan: Tuloy ang Pagbabago

  • CHILDREN
  • COLLEGE
  • DISABILITY
  • DISPLACEMENT DUE TO DISASTERS
  • ELECTRICITY
  • FARMERS FORESTERS FISHERFOLKS-
  • HIGHSCHOOL
  • IP Listahanan data
  • IP
  • MALE
  • Nutrition
  • OCCUPATION
  • OUTER WALLS
  • POOR HHS
  • ROOF
  • SAFE WATER ACCESS
  • SENIOR CITIZENS
  • http://wowslider.com/
  • WOMEN
cssslider by WOWSlider.com v8.7

Transparency Seal

Organizational Outcomes

Reference Maps

Tweet Us use Hashtag #DSWDMIMAROPA

June 2018
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Related Sites

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